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Category: Experimental Design

OpenSesame Tutorial: Using Image Stimuli

In this OpenSesame tutorial we will learn how to use images as stimuli and how to load the trials; including filenames, correct responses, and conditions from a pre-generated CSV file. To follow this tutorial you don’t need to know Python programming. However, we are going to generate the CSV file using a short Python script. This can be done manually, of course. See also this OpenSesame tutorial.

OpenSesame Tutorial – How to Create a Flanker Task

In this post you are going to learn how to create a simple experiment using the free experiment building software OpenSesame. As I have previously written about, OpenSesame, is an application, based on Python, for creating Psychology, Neuroscience, and Economics experiments. It offers a nice and easy to use interface.  In this interface you can drag-and-drop different objects. This means that you don’t have to know any Python programming at all to create an experiment. If you need to know how to use images as stimuli you can see this OpenSesame Tutorial.

How to create a psychology exeriment using OpenSesame

What is the Cross-modal oddball paradigm?

My current research focus on how attention can be captured by deviating stimuli. I will briefly describe the paradigm I have used – the cross-modal oddball task. Before I go into the cross-modal oddball task I will describe the auditory oddball task. In the oddball paradigm the subjects are exposed to a repetitive stream of distracting sounds. Furthermore, they can be either passive (i.e., watching a film) or engaged in a task (i.e., making judgments of durations of the tones). Typically subjects are exposed to two types of  distractors; one standard, presented frequently (i.e., 80 % of trials), and an oddball (‘Novel’ or ‘Deviant’) presented on infrequent trials (i.e., 20 % of the trials).

Cross-modal oddball sound sequence
Example of an oddball sequence. Black tones represent standard sounds and red represents deviant or novel sounds.

There is a plethora of research using the oddball paradigm in examining electrophysiological responses (i.e., ERPs) to deviating sounds (for reviews see; Bendixen, SanMiguel, & Schröger, 2012; Friedman, Cycowicz, & Gaeta, 2001). However, when engaged in a primary task there is also a behavioral cost – the response time to target tone is slowed by the presentation of a deviant (e.g., Berti, 2008).