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Tag: .dta

How to Read and Write Stata (.dta) Files in R with Haven

In this post, we are going to learn how to read Stata (.dta) files in R statistical environment. Specifically, we will learn 1) who to import .dta files in R using Haven, and 2) how to write dataframes to .dta file.

Data Import in R: Reading Stata Files

Now, R is, as we all know, a superb statistical programming environment. When it comes to importing and storing data, we can store our data in the native .rda format. However, if we have a collaborator that uses other statistical software (e.g., Stata) and/or that are storing their data in different formats (e.g., .dta files).

Now, this is when R shows us its brilliance; as an R user we can load data from a range of file formats; e.g., SAS (.7bdat), Stata (.dta), Excel (e.g., .xlsx), and CSV (.csv). On this site there are other tutorials on how to import data from (some) of these formats:

Before we go on and learn how to read SAS files in R, we will answer the questions:

Tutorial: How to Read Stata Files in Python with Pandas

In this post, we are going to learn how to read Stata (.dta) files in Python.

As previously described (in the read .sav files in Python post) Python is a general-purpose language that also can be used for doing data analysis and data visualization. One example of data visualization will be found in this post.

One potential downside, however, is that Python is not really user-friendly for data storage. This has, of course, lead to that our data many times are stored using Excel, SPSS, SAS, or similar software. See, for instance, the posts about reading .sav, and sas files in Python: